data breach

Benefits of Mobile device management (MDM)

Mobile device management (MDM) is a type of security software used by an IT department to monitor, manage and secure employees' mobile devices that are deployed across multiple mobile service providers and across multiple mobile operating systems being used in the organization. Mobile device management (MDM) capabilities give you the fundamental visibility and IT controls needed to secure, manage, and monitor any corporate or employee owned mobile device or laptops that accesses business critical data.

Mobile device management (MDM) solution provides immediate, on-device threat protection, protecting against device, app and network threats even when the device is offline.d:

  • Detect the attack immediately

  • Notify the device user through mobile clients and enterprise admin through centralized console

  • Take preventive actions to protect company data through custom compliance actions

Administrators can use our capabilities to find all the devices that have the vulnerable versions of WhatsApp on them and assign compliance actions to only those devices, while not affecting the productivity of users running updated version of the compromised app.

Benefits of Mobile device management (MDM)

More control and security

An effective MDM system guarantees the protection of company data, e-mails, and confidential documents. If a device is lost or stolen, the administrator can easily lock, disconnect, or lock the mobile device. SIM cards can also be blocked for employees’ mobile devices and if somebody tries to transfer the SIM to another device they will need a PUK code.

MDM offers better control over their devices. For example, a company’s sales employee will not have to register and configure all devices used by their sales agents. Instead, you can configure the device and use the security software automatically. Certain tools and applications can also be sent to agent devices. If you want the app to be configured at start-up or if you want an automatic application or replacement updates throughout the enterprise, you can easily do it manually without having to call the device.

Powerful and Highly Efficient Management

Practically, mobile devices can distract employees. If organizations want to limit or prohibit the use of certain apps on their devices and avoid unnecessary data costs, IT managers can block YouTube, Facebook, or other social media apps. Take, for example, the company’s rescue services. As drivers need to focus on the road, some companies use MDM to prevent them from using other apps than the transport app and Waze or Google Maps while driving. This not only ensures operational efficiency, but also security

Increased flexibility

Working from anywhere with a mobile device gives access to relevant files anytime, anywhere and in any situation. Some tools gives you that luxury, for example, the vendors of the company do not need to download the resources separately from different portals. The centralized MDM system enables more efficient distribution of business documents, such as training forms and learning materials, accessible only to authorized individuals.

Find the right MDM solution

As the businesses focus on productivity, efficiency, and security, and with more and more companies choosing BYOD (Bring your own device), MDM is ready to respond to feature requests that help them take control of the device while providing their employees with freedom, security, and productivity.

Quest Diagnostics Data Breach: 12 Million Patient Records

Clinical laboratory firm Quest Diagnostics Inc. has admitted exposure of personal information of nearly 12 million customers after its web payment page was accessed by an unauthorized individual. On Monday, the diagnostic testing provider confirmed in a filing with securities regulators that up to 12 million patients may be affected by a recent data breach at the American Medical Collection Agency. The AMCA was also the third party responsible for a recent LabCorp data breach affecting 7.7 million customers, the testing company said Tuesday. Apart from personal medical information, the company reported that the affected patients’ Social Security numbers and financial data were breached as well, leaving patients susceptible to financial fraud.

The breach happened through a contractor of a contractor. Quest outsources its billing collections to Optum360, which in turn used American Medical Collection Agency for such services. AMCA told Quest on May 14 that it suffered a possible incident, but it's unclear exactly when a hack might have occurred. Quest said it doesn't have "detailed or complete information about the AMCA data security incident, including which information of which individuals may have been affected."

Quest also said it hasn't been able to verify the accuracy of the information received from AMCA. Quest said that it hasn't used AMCA for collections since it learned of the incident and that it is "working with forensic experts to investigate the matter."

Quest was made aware of the breach on May 14, but has not been able to verify AMCA's statement, nor does the company know exactly which patients have been involved. Once the firm has a better understanding of the situation, impacted patients will be told. Since learning of the data breach, AMCA collection requests have been suspended. Law enforcement has been notified and a cyber forensics firm has been hired to investigate the security incident.

"We hired a third-party external forensics firm to investigate any potential security breach in our systems, migrated our web payments portal services to a third-party vendor, and retained additional experts to advise on, and implement, steps to increase our systems' security," Quest said in a statement.

Quest said it's taking the matter "very seriously" and has suspended collections requests to the AMCA. Quest said patients will be notified and that it's working with forensic experts to investigate the breach.

Decrease Potential Data Breach, with Simple Security Control

Some senior management folks might find this strange, but you can significantly make your organization harder to breach. In fact, just a handful of defenses can do more to lower your cybersecurity risk than anything else. These include fighting social engineering and phishing better, patching the most likely to be attacked software far better, and requiring multi-factor authentication (MFA) for all logons.

Zero-day and information system protection

Because zero-day flaws usually refer to software that is widely in use, it’s generally considered good form if one experiences such an attack to share any available details with the rest of the world about how the attack appears to work — in much the same way you might hope a sick patient suffering from some unknown, highly infectious disease might nonetheless choose to help doctors diagnose how the infection could have been caught and spread. patch management is critical in protecting information technology systems.

Ransomware Breach and Criminals

The typical use case for ransomware is a shotgun approach type distribution campaign of dropping ransomware on people's machines, and then you charge them for getting their data or services back,” says Jeffery Walker, CISO at CyberSecOp. “Another use case is for covering tracks. These tools have the façade of ransomware: They would encrypt data, they would post a ransom note, and they would ask for money. They will even give you details on how to pay, but they're used to remove things from the endpoint while throwing off defenders into believing that the reason why that data was lost was because of a random hit by ransomware, but in some cases this is a cover up of a more bigger breach”

Vulnerabilities and Exploits

These are all vulnerabilities that could be exploited by cybercriminals bent on stealing personally identifiable information and protected health information – activity that could also play havoc disrupting healthcare delivery processes.

The study, based on network traffic data monitored by CyberSecOp over a six-month period, found the most prevalent method attackers use to hide command-and-control communications in healthcare networks was hidden HTTPS tunnels.

CyberSecOp compliance solutions deliver cost-effective data protection, data discovery, data classification and data loss prevention for data privacy and compliance.

Data Breaches Ransomware and Cyber Attacks

Data Breaches Ransomware and Cyber Attacks

It’s unrealistic to think that you can completely avoid cyberattacks and data breaches, so it’s vital to have a proper data recovery plan in place. You can also tighten your defenses significantly by ensuring all of your network devices are properly configured, and by putting some thought into all of your potential network borders.

Data Recovery Capability

Do you have a proper backup plan in place? Have you ever tested it to see that it works? Disaster recovery is absolutely vital, but an alarming number of companies do not have an adequate system in place. A survey of 400 IT executives by IDG Research revealed that 40% rate their organizations’ ability to recover their operations in the event of disaster or disruption as “fair or poor.” Three out of four companies fail from a disaster recovery standpoint, according to the Disaster Recovery Preparedness Benchmark.

A successful malware attack can lead to altered data on all compromised machines and the full effects are often very difficult to determine. The option to roll back to a backup that predates the infection is vital. Backed up data must be encrypted and physically protected. It’s also important that a test team routinely checks a random sampling of system backups by restoring them and verifying data integrity.

Secure Configurations for Network Devices such as Firewalls, Routers, and Switches

The default configurations for network devices like firewalls, routers, and switches are all about ease of use and deployment. They aren’t designed with security in mind and they can be exploited by determined attackers. There’s also a risk that companies will create exceptions for business reasons and then fail to properly analyze the potential impact.

The 2015 Information Security Breaches Survey found that failure to keep technical configuration up to date was a factor in 19% of incidents. Attackers are skilled at seeking out vulnerable default settings and exploiting them. Organizations should have standardized secure configuration guidelines applied across devices. Security updates must be applied in a timely fashion.

You need to employ two-factor authentication and encrypted sessions when managing network devices, and engineers should use an isolated, dedicated machine without Internet access. It’s also important to use automated tools to monitor the network and track device configurations. Changes should be flagged and rule sets analyzed to ensure consistency.

Boundary Defense

When the French built the Maginot Line in World War II, a series of impregnable fortifications that extended along the border with Germany and beyond, it failed to protect them because the Germans invaded around the North end through neutral Belgium. There’s an important lesson there for security professionals: Attackers will often find weaknesses in perimeter systems and then pivot to get deeper into your territory.

They may gain access through a trusted partner, or possibly an extranet, while your defensive eye is focused on the Internet. Effective defenses are multi-layered systems of firewalls, proxies, and DMZ perimeter networks. You need to filter inbound and outbound traffic and take caution not to blur the boundaries between internal and external networks. Consider network-based IDS sensors and IPS devices to detect attacks and block bad traffic.

Segment your network and protect each sector with a proxy and firewall to limit access as far as possible. If you don’t have internal network protection, then intruders can get their hands on the keys to the kingdom by successfully breaching the outer defenses.

The real cost

A lot of businesses argue that they can’t afford a comprehensive disaster recovery plan, but they should really consider whether they can afford to lose all their data or be uncertain about its integrity. They may lack the expertise to ensure that network devices are securely configured, but attackers don’t lack the skills to exploit that. It’s understandably common to focus on the outer boundary of your network and forget about threats that come from unexpected directions or multiply internally, but it could prove costly indeed.

Compared to the cost of a data breach, all of these things are cheap and easy to set up

HealthCare.gov system hack leaves 75,000 individuals exposed

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) experienced a data breach leading to exposure of highly sensitive personal data of nearly 75,000 people. The CMS is a government system linked with healthCare.gov which assists insurance agents and brokers in helping people register for its healthcare plans.

A hack was detected earlier this month in a government computer system that works alongside HealthCare.gov, exposing the personal information of approximately 75,000 people, according to the agency in charge of the portal.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services made the announcement late in the afternoon ahead of a weekend, a time slot that agencies often use to release unfavorable developments.

The announcement was made late Friday by the CMS to confirm the data breach but details about the stolen data and content haven’t been provided as yet. It is, however, confirmed that personal files of 75,000 people have been exposed to hackers.

The brokers and agents use the Federally Facilitated Exchange’s Direct Enrollment pathway to convince customers to enroll in health insurance. The pathway was compromised by the attackers between 13 Oct and 16 Oct 2018, confirmed CMS.

The hacked system was connected to the Healthcare.gov website, the front-facing portal for anyone signing up for an insurance plan under former President Obama’s healthcare law, the Affordable Care Act. Hackers targeted the behind-the-scenes system that insurance agents used to help customers directly enroll in new plans, and not the consumer Healthcare.gov site itself. 

In order to sign up for healthcare plans, customers have to give over a ton of personal data — including names, addresses, and their social security number. CMS didn’t say exactly what kind of data was included in the stolen files, nor did it say how the breach happened.

About 10 million people currently have private coverage under former President Barack Obama’s health care law.

Consumers applying for subsidized coverage have to provide extensive personal information, including Social Security numbers, income and citizenship or legal immigration status.

The system that was hacked is used by insurance agents and brokers to directly enroll customers. All other signup systems are working.

CMS spokesman Johnathan Monroe said “nothing happened” to the HealthCare.gov website used by the general public. “This concerns the agent and broker portal, which is not accessible to the general public,” he said.

Federal law enforcement has been alerted and affected customers will be notified and offered credit protection.

Facebook Data Taken- Breach

SAN FRANCISCO – Facebook says 30 million fewer accounts were breached than originally thought in one of the worst security incidents at the giant social network – 30 million instead of 50 million – but attackers made off with sensitive personal information from nearly half of those users that could put them at serious risk, including phone number and email address, recent searches on Facebook, location history and the types of devices people used to access the service.

Hackers got their hands on data from 30 million accounts as part of last month's attack, Facebook disclosed Friday. Facebook originally estimated that 50 million accounts could have been affected but the company didn't know if they had been compromised.

For about half of those whose accounts broken into – some 14 million people – the hackers looted extensive personal information such as the last 10 places that Facebook user checked into, their current city and their 15 most recent searches. For the other 15 million, hackers accessed name and contact details, according to Facebook. Attackers didn’t take any information from about 1 million people whose accounts were affected. Facebook says hackers did not gain access to financial information, such as credit-card numbers.

The company would not say what the motive of the attackers was but said it had no reason to believe the attack was related to the November midterm elections.

Facebook users can check if their data was stolen by visiting the company's Help Center. Facebook says it will advise affected users on how they can protect themselves from suspicious emails and other attempts to exploit the stolen data. Guy Rosen, Facebook's vice president of product management, said the company hasn't seen any evidence of attackers exploiting the stolen data or that it had been posted on the dark web.

Affected users should be on the lookout for unwanted phone calls, text messages or emails from people they don't know and attempts to use their email address and phone number to target spam or attempts to phish for other information. Facebook users should also be wary of messages or emails claiming to be from Facebook, the company said.

Third-party apps and Facebook apps such as Instagram and WhatsApp were not compromised, according to Facebook. Hackers were not able to access any private messages but messages received or exchanged by Facebook page administrators may have been exposed.

Security experts say the 14 million users who had extensive personal information swiped are now extremely vulnerable. Colin Bastable, CEO of Lucy Security, which focuses on cybersecurity prevention and awareness, painted an especially grim scenario.

"The truth is that, as a result of this news, millions of phishing attacks will now be launched, pretending to be from Facebook. Up to 20 percent of recipients will click and a large number of those will be successfully attacked, many of them using work computers and mobile devices," Bastable said. "Businesses and governments will lose money, ransomware attacks will result from this leak, and the attack will reverberate over many months."

The culprits behind the massive hack have not been publicly identified. The FBI is actively investigating the hack and asked Facebook not to disclose any information about potential perpetrators, Rosen said. When they disclosed the breach two weeks ago, Facebook officials said they didn't know who was behind the attacks.

The latest disclosure, another in a series of security lapses that have shaken public confidence in Facebook, may intensify political heat on the company. An investigation is underway by Ireland's Data Protection Commission, and Rosen said Facebook is also cooperating with the Federal Trade Commission and other authorities. The FTC declined to comment if it's investigating.

“Today's update from Facebook is significant now that it is confirmed that the personal data of millions of users was taken by the perpetrators of the attack," Ireland’s Data Protection Commission, the watchdog agency charged with privacy protection in the European Union, said in a tweet.

The extent of the personal information compromised by attackers delivered a blow to the public relations campaign Facebook has been waging to convince the more than 2 billion people who regularly use the service that it's serious about protecting their personal information after the accounts of 87 million users were accessed by political targeting firm Cambridge Analytica without their consent and Russian operatives spread propaganda during and after the 2016 presidential election.

This week, Google acknowledged that half a million accounts on its Google + social network could have been compromised by a software bug. The admission prompted lawmakers to call for an FTC investigation. Both incidents could further fuel a congressional push for a national privacy law to protect U.S. users of tech company services.

"These companies have a staggering amount of information about Americans. Breaches don't just violate our privacy, they create enormous risks for our economy and national security," Federal Trade Commission Commissioner Rohit Chopra told USA TODAY after Facebook disclosed the data breach last month. "The cost of inaction is growing, and we need answers."

More: Facebook breach puts your identity at risk. Here's what you can do to protect yourself

More: Largest Facebook hack ever turns up heat on Mark Zuckerberg

More: Facebook's 50 million account breach is already its biggest ever -- and may get even worse

More: Midterms: 'Furious' Democrats purchase blitz of Facebook ads on Kavanaugh, far outpacing GOP spending

After the accounts were compromised last month, more than 90 million users were forced to log out of their accounts as a security measure.

Facebook says attackers exploited a feature in its code that allowed them to commandeer users' accounts. Those accounts included Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his second-in-command, Sheryl Sandberg.

The attack began Sept. 14. A spike in traffic triggered an internal investigation. More than a week later, on Sept. 25, Facebook identified the vulnerability and fixed it two days later.

The vulnerability was introduced in July 2017 when a feature was added that allows users to upload happy birthday videos.

Attackers exploited a vulnerability in Facebook’s code that affected "View As," a feature that lets people see what their own profile looks like to someone else. The feature was built to give users more control over their privacy. Three software bugs in Facebook's code connected to this feature allowed attackers to steal Facebook access tokens they could then use to take over people's accounts.

These access tokens are like digital keys that keep people logged in to Facebook so they don’t need to re-enter their password every time they use Facebook.

Here's how it worked: Once the attackers had access to a token for one account, call it Jane's, they could then use "View As" to see what another account, say Tom's, could see about Jane's account. The vulnerability enabled the attackers to get an access token for Tom's account as well, and the attack spread from there. Facebook said it has turned off the "View As" feature as a security precaution.

Last month, Facebook reset the tokens of nearly 50 million accounts that it believed were affected and, as a precaution, also reset the tokens for another 40 million accounts that had used "View As" in the past year. Resetting the tokens logged the affected Facebook users out of the service.

A breach of this kind is not a single, isolated event, warned Adrien Gendre, CEO of Vade Secure North America, an email security company. Hackers don't profit from breaking into Facebook accounts. Money's made, he noted, by launching spear phishing attacks using the data they've purloined, an increasingly common form of cyberattack where hackers spoof someone's identity to get them to complete a write transfer or share confidential information.

And that's very bad news for the 14 million Facebook users who had intimate personal information stolen.

T-Mobile Hit With Security Breach 2 Millon Affected

On Aug. 20, hackers hit T-Mobile and, according to a statement from the company, gained access to personal information for some of its customers. While no financial data or Social Security numbers were exposed, information including names, billing ZIP codes, phone numbers, email addresses, account numbers, and account types was potentially compromised.

While the company has not released concrete numbers for the hack, it is estimated that approximately 2 million customers were affected.

The company, with approximately 77 million total users, has notified affected customers via text message and post the following message for it customers. 

T-Mobile Notice 

Dear Customer –

Out of an abundance of caution, we wanted to let you know about an incident that we recently handled that may have impacted some of your personal information.

On August 20, our cyber-security team discovered and shut down an unauthorized access to certain information, including yours, and we promptly reported it to authorities. None of your financial data (including credit card information) or social security numbers were involved, and no passwords were compromised. However, you should know that some of your personal information may have been exposed, which may have included one or more of the following: name, billing zip code, phone number, email address, account number and account type (prepaid or postpaid).

If you have questions about this incident or your account, please contact Customer Care at your convenience. If you are a T-Mobile customer, you can dial 611, use two-way messaging on MyT-Mobile.com, the T-Mobile App, or iMessage through Apple Business Chat. You can also request a call back or schedule a time for your Team of Experts to call you through both the T-Mobile App and MyT-Mobile.com. If you are a T-Mobile For Business or Metro PCS customer, just dial 611 from your mobile phone.

We take the security of your information very seriously and have a number of safeguards in place to protect your personal information from unauthorized access. We truly regret that this incident occurred and are so sorry for any inconvenience this has caused you.

YAHOO To Pay $35 Millions, Massive CyberSecurity Breach

Altaba, the company formerly known as Yahoo, agreed to pay the Securities and Exchange Commission a $35 million fine for failing to disclose to investors a massive data breach for two years, the regulator announced Tuesday.

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Altaba agreed to pay the fine without admitting nor denying any wrongdoing.

According to the SEC, Yahoo learned of an intrusion by Russian hackers in 2016 just days after it occurred. The incident resulted in the theft of sensitive information and credentials of 500 million users. And while news of the breach circulated within the company, Yahoo didn’t properly investigate the breach or consider whether to inform its investors, the SEC said. News of the incident only became public when Yahoo was in the midst of being acquired by Verizon.

“Yahoo’s failure to have controls and procedures in place to assess its cyber-disclosure obligations ended up leaving its investors totally in the dark about a massive data breach,” said Jina Choi, director of the SEC’s San Francisco regional office, in a statement. “Public companies should have controls and procedures in place to properly evaluate cyber incidents and disclose material information to investors.”

The SEC notes that Yahoo could have disclosed its breach in several quarterly filings during the two years between the breach and its public revelation. But the company said that it faced “only the risk of, and negative effects that might flow from, data breaches,” the SEC said.

The regulator said that Yahoo did not have proper procedures in place to make sure that information from its information security team was vetted for potential disclosure.

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., the ranking member on the Senate Banking Subcommittee on Securities, Insurance, and Investment, tweeted in vindication, saying that breaches like Yahoo’s can’t be swept “under the rug.”

In February, the SEC issued guidance telling companies to be transparent with investors when it comes to cybersecurity incidents and risks.

Sentencing proceedings for one of the hackers implicated in the 2014 incident began Tuesday in federal court. Canadian citizen Karim Baratov pleaded guilty in November to assist in the attack.

Yahoo the web service continues to operate by the same name under Oath, Verizon’s digital media division. Yahoo the corporation became Altaba, a holding company, after the Verizon sale in 2017.

Fresenius five separate data breaches and agreed to pay $3.5 million

Medical supplies giant Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) agreed to pay $3.5 million to U.S. federal regulators after five separate data breaches in 2012.

The  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights levied the fine along with a corrective action plan to settle potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules. A federal investigation found the company failed to conduct an accurate risk analysis of vulnerabilities to its protected information.

FMCNA filed five breach reports in January 2013 covering incidents from February-July 2012 impacting the electronic protected health information for five FMCNA-owned branches across the United States.

The list of violations is long. One branch didn’t encrypt sensitive information, another had no policies around removing hardware from facilities, two businesses had no safeguards against unauthorized access or theft while yet another had no procedure to address security incidents, according to the federal investigation.

“The number of breaches, involving a variety of locations and vulnerabilities, highlights why there is no substitute for an enterprise-wide risk analysis for a covered entity,” OCR Director Roger Severino said in a statement. “Covered entities must take a thorough look at their internal policies and procedures to ensure they are protecting their patients’ health information in accordance with the law.”

Fresenius Medical Care is a German-based international conglomerate that sells medical supplies around the world, with a concentration on kidney health. The company makes about $18 billion per year in revenue as of FY 2016.

FMCNA did not respond to a request for comment.